Why Are Africans Loud in Public?

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Migration is part of human nature, People migrate to places for different reasons as they do they export their culture and tradition; seemingly displaying and showing off their local demeanor to their new neighbors with little regards or no recognition on how their host country/citizens view their actions.

 

As of today, Africans are known as the most migrated people on earth with majority opting for Europe and America in search of a better life, a mass movement of some sort occasioned and encouraged as a result of the unending man made poverty and economic crisis rocking the continent, which is a direct fall out of Weak leadership, Corruption and Ineptitude.

Regrettably, In a continent where every aspect of modern infrastructure and strict environmental policies/regulations are nothing to write home about, the problem of Noise pollution caused by unworthy road automobiles and vehicular movement, uncontrollable mega phones from religious outfits are alarming and detrimental; this odd factor has crippled and destroyed the noise sensitivity of many people especially those living in urban areas.

The loud an environment is the louder people in it become in an attempt to communicate with one another. That’s the situation in most African cities where Governments at all level has ignored the huge devastation noise pollution has on people, thereby forcing millions of people to unknowingly act, speak and answer in loud and nosier manners .

Apparently, the side effect of this entrenched behavioral abnormality is that those who travel outside the shores of Africa do export this being loud attitude to the new world, prolonging an age held view that Africans are insensitive when it comes to noise pollution. This does not mean they are the only people who are considered loud in public rather, Statistics indicates them as the only group who are resilient to adjustment when it comes to new environments.

However, the impact of these environmental factors shows Africans who live in Germany are proned to being loud in public, either in Buses or Trains, talking on phones, it seems natural to them. Although the Germans won’t say it, they are uncomfortable when it comes to any form of communication which appears disturbing to the general public. Mind you we are not referring to the kind of noise some youths make in Trains or Buses, that along is understood as youthful exuberance.

Objectively this article is a wakeup call, while we hope a time will come when Governments in Africa will wake up to its overall responsibility and help put in measures to control the noise pollution affecting our people. The onus is upon each and every one of us to improve and adjust to our new environment as a way to guarantee our acceptance and reduces the tendency of segregation by other group.

Adams, Kennedy Chidi