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Germany's intelligence service is taking the escalating cyber threat increasingly seriously and now hopes to entice a horde of hackers to defend against foreign IT attacks, it emerged on Sunday.

Germany's Federal Intelligence Service (BND) is planning to set up a new department exclusively dedicated to fending off the growing number of cyber attacks on government agencies and industry, wrote Der Spiegel magazine, citing government sources.

The agency is now frantically searching for up to 130 new employees to man the cyber defence station. The BND had hoped to win over hackers and anti-virus experts with high salaries, but recruitment is proving difficult, and they are now scouring the country's universities for suitable candidates.

The move is in response to a sharp escalation in cyber warfare, also a growing concern in the US. In recent months German intelligence services recorded up to five attacks a day on government authorities alone, BND head Gerhard Schindler recently told MPs, said the magazine.

Schindler warned politicians the threat from the attacks, thought mainly to originate in China, was very real. The government is concerned that without adequate defence systems, foreign hackers would be in a position to paralyse industry, infrastructure, communications and government processes.

Although the attackers had so far only accessed data, Schindler warned that the stolen information could be used as the basis of future sabotage attacks against arms manufacturers, telecommunications companies and government and military agencies.

The Local/jlb

A 19-year-old German woman was left appalled after receiving a letter offering work in a brothel by her local job centre. Good looks, however, were a prerequisite for the position.

The unnamed teen had been looking for work since last November and was thrilled when the job centre finally sent her an offer last week. But serving drinks at a nude bar at one of Bavarian city Augsburg's biggest brothels, the Colosseum, was not exactly what she had in mind.

The trained housekeeper told the Augsburger Allgemeine Zeitung newspaper she was “totally horrified” at the suggestion as was her mother, who screamed after reading about the 42-hour working week, with shifts on mostly evenings and weekends.

Augsburg's job centre told the newspaper that they knew they were offering positions in a brothel but were careful to ring potential applicants to talk about the job before sending a letter, to see if they were suitable and explain the job.

This had not happened in the young woman's case though, which director of the centre Roland Fürst told the newspaper was a mistake. “We would never offer jobs in prostitution,” he stressed, but added that “we knew the establishment was operating in the red light district.”

That the centre had not spoken with the 19-year-old on the phone first was, Fürst said, “something that should not have happened.” He added that “we are very sorry.” Eight other potential brothel employees received phone calls.

After apologising to the woman, the job centre said it would no longer be offering work at the Colosseum and would try to check more carefully the companies who advertise through the state-run office.

The Local/jcw

A Swiss vote on Sunday in favour of giving small shareholders the right to cap executives' pay has prompted German politicians to call for a similar law in this country.

More than two-thirds of Swiss voters came out on Sunday in favour of a new law that would allow shareholders to decide what salaries the top executives should get, and get rid of "golden handshakes" - bonuses for top managers departing or arriving on the board.

The result prompted several German politicians to come out in favour of a similar law not only in Germany, but in Europe.

"The referendum is an important step in the right direction," Joachim Poß, deputy parliamentary leader for the centre-left Social Democratic Party (SPD), told the Neue Osnabbrücker Zeitung. "The result should be understood as an encouragement for the introduction of a European directive."

Poß admitted that the Swiss law could not be imported wholesale as it is, but the principle was important. "People no longer accept this perverse bonus system that exists not only in banks but in industry generally," he said.

Michael Fuchs, economic policy spokesman for Chancellor Angela Merkel's Christian Democratic Union, also welcomed the Swiss initiative. "It's a way of making sure that salary decisions are made by the owners of companies, not by the state," he told the Bild newspaper.

"There is no explanation other than greed for the fact that a DAX board member earns 54 times as much as a worker," Katja Kipping, head of the socialist Left party told the WAZ newspaper group. She said that Germany needs a debate on the "limits of inequality."

Gerhard Schick, finance policy spokesman for the Green party, also called on the German government to send a signal. "We need stronger rules against salary excesses in Germany," he said.

Top 10 Best paid CEOs in Europe

Position 10: Dieter Zetsche

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The Mercedes-Benz is a symbol of his success: Dieter Zetsche, CEO of Daimler, earns. 8,654,000 Euros. In addition, the 59-year is a board member of RWE Power.

Position 9: Peter Löscher

 Peter Loscher 300dpi

The CEO of Siemens, Peter Löscher, The annual income of the native Austrian is about 8,708,633.

Position 8: Josef Ackermann

 2012-05-29 23 30 46 josef ackermann

Ackermann celebrates after his retirement as CEO of Deutsche Bank successes. 2011, he earned € 9,355,150.


Position 7: Terry Leahy

 Terry Leahy

The Briton, Terry Leahy is the seventh top earner in Europe. The CEO of Tesco, the third largest supermarket chain in the world, has an annual income of 9,922,936 Euros.

Position 6: Severin Schwan

 Severin Schwan

In his capacity as CEO of Swiss pharmaceutical company Roche Severin Schwan earned last year Euro 10,021,932. The CEOs of pharmaceutical companies in Europe are the people with the highest income.

Position 5: Peter Voser

 Peter-Voser

Three years ago, the chief executive of Royal Dutch Shell, Peter Voser, was the best paid European Manager. With an income of 10,208,000 Euros, he is now only in fifth place.

Position 4: Bernard Arnault

 56092-bernard-arnault-1bWF4LTY1NXgw

Bernard Arnault, leads to not only the list of the richest Europeans, but is also head of luxury goods group LVMH. The annual income of the major shareholder of Christian Dior is 10,696,670 Euros - it also secures 4th place in the list of Europe's most paid Managers.

Position 3: Alfredo Saenz Abad

 Alfredo Saenz Abad

Abad is the only Spaniard in the list of Europe's best paid managers. The graduate economist is CEO of Bank Santander and earned 10.723 million Euros.

Position 2: Joseph Jimenez

 joe jimenez novartis.top

Jimenez is CEO of Swiss biotechnology and pharmaceutical company Novartis, the world's second largest company in the industry. His annual income is € 12,544,596.

Position 1: Martin Winterkorn

 Martin Winterkorn Volkswagen

Toping the list is the German CEO of Volkswagen (VW) Martin Winterkorn, is the best paid manager in Europe! His annual income is currently at 16,596,206 Euros.

Landing a job in Germany as a foreigner can be tough. But knowing what German employers expect from your CV could mean the crucial difference between getting an interview and getting dumped in the wastepaper basket.


The Local spoke to professional careers advisers to find out how job-seekers in Germany can turn a English-language curriculum vitae into a slimmed-down, factual German Lebenslauf.

When sending out an application in Germany it's important to get the layout of your CV correct. If your information is where German employers will be expecting it, your document will be much easier for them to process at a glance.

"It's really important to know what you're doing when writing your German CV. It will get thrown out if you don't do it in the style which Germans are used to," career adviser Heidi Störr told The Local.

The first thing to note is that a Lebenslauf is one or two pages in a formal, fact sheet format, which looks and feels very different in style and content from a typical English CV.

“The Lebenslauf is a datasheet, a fact sheet,” Gerhard Winkler, contributor to Der Spiegel magazine's online careers section, told The Local. “The cover letter is a briefing – where you show how you're right for the job. Both texts are best when they are factual, sober list free of egotistical statements.”

German CVs are also set out in a two-columned table. You need to separate the table into six rows under the following headings written on the left column: 'Personal Details,' 'Professional Experience,' 'Education and Training,' 'Voluntary Work,' 'Scholarships' and 'Computer and Language Skills.'

Underneath each of these headings on the left go your exact dates - the time frames of activities, training or jobs which you will list in the right-hand column opposite. It's best to put activities in reverse chronological order, starting with the most recent, according to career advisers.

The column on the right is where you enter your experiences. Underneath each job title or educational programme, describe your role in short, keyword sentences, concentrating on what you consider the most relevant details for the job you are applying for.

Germans tend to consider some information you might have on your English CV to be superfluous or even egotistical, said Winkler, so leave out any description of personal qualities, interests and hobbies, but do include membership of groups or organizations under 'Voluntary Work.'

There are a few must-have personal details every Lebenslauf should include which you might not have on your original CV: a photo, your marital status and place of birth. Also make sure you cover your language and computer skills in detail.

The photo question

Unlike most English resumes, German CVs always include a passport-style professional photo in the upper right-hand corner - a detail advisers say you would do well not to leave out.

"German employers are used to seeing a photo on a résumé, they can't explicitly demand in the job advert that you put one because that goes against privacy laws," Störr told The Local.

"But they'll be looking for it so always put one. A photo allows potential employers to make a different kind of personal connection with someone and will help them connect your skills with your face when you come to an interview."

Finally, since you will be applying for a job in a German workplace, you need to think carefully about which language to use on your CV. Advisers say if your German is up to it you would do well to show it off.

“If you can do it in German, make the effort, it doesn't have to be word-perfect,” said Störr.

But if those German lessons have not quite paid off yet, then avoid the temptation to get it translated and leave it in English. This will avoid any awkward moments if you get to an interview and an employer decides to test out your language skills.

“If an applicant has no or only a little German but has written their CV in German it would give the impression they had better language skills than they actually had, which could lead to problems,” said Störr.

“Personally, if English was my first language I'd write applications in Germany in English – unless I had to prove excellent German language skills for the job,” Winkler told The Local.

Generally, said Winkler it was important to remember his golden rule for CV writing: “Stick to the facts.”

Josie Le Blond

Caroline Noeding, a 21-year-old blonde mathematics and Spanish student from Hannover, has been crowned this year’s Miss Germany. First runner-up, awarded at the competition on Saturday, was 17-year-old high school student Jule Antea Walkowiak from Steinburg near Hamburg


Third place went to Sifa Cakarer, also a 17-year-old student, from Oldenburg.

Noeding competed against 23 hopefuls from state and regional beauty contests for this year’s prize. Competitions were held in the evening gown and bikini categories. The 16-member jury, which included a plastic surgeon, first narrowed the field down to eight and then picked the top three.

Noeding will take a year off from her studies during her Miss Germany reign. In addition to the crown she will be awarded a sports car, jewelry, clothing and a trip to Cyprus.

The Miss Germany competition started in 1927 and is, according to its organisers, Germany’s oldest and most important beauty contest. More than 5,000 women competed in 115 preliminary pageants before the final contest took place on Saturday.

Last year’s winner was 22-year-old Isabel Gülck from Schleswig-Holstein.

YouTube’s dispute with Germany’s music rights authority GEMA has resulted in the country being cut off from more than 60 percent of the website’s most popular videos, according to a new analysis.

It’s common occurrence for internet users in Germany. A friend sends around a link to a cool band or the new David Bowie song, but clicking through to the popular video platform YouTube ends the journey with the frustrating notice: “This video is not available in Germany because it possibly contains music for which GEMA hasn’t approved the rights.”

And now an app developed by the Berlin-based data journalism outfit OpenDataCity shows the extent of the digital embargo. Germany cannot see 61.5 percent of YouTube’s top 1,000 videos – far more than the 15 percent blocked in South Sudan and the five percent that is taboo in the Vatican

 

thelocal

Berlin fire fighters called on Monday to an underground garage put out a blaze only to find a 30-metre-long tunnel leading to the vaults of a nearby bank - which had been emptied.


The fire, which police believe was begun by the thieves in an attempt to erase any evidence and cause a distraction while they robbed the bank, broke out at around 6:15 am theTagesspiegel regional paper reported.

The thieves had smashed through reinforced concrete to dig their tunnel, meaning they must have had access to heavy duty equipment.

Police were still examining the scene in the Steglitz area of the capital on Monday afternoon and are yet to have found any clues pointing to suspects, despite thorough questioning of people living in the area.

Exactly how much money was stolen from the Volksbank branch has not been revealed and police said they had no idea where the ground excavated from the tunnel had ended up.

A similar incident took place in the southern part of Berlin in 1995, when an 11-strong gang tunnelled into a bank in Zehlendorf and took 16 hostages as well as several million euros.

The Local/jcw

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